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Re: Celts and Germans - A Roman's Definition

Salve Andrew!

Your dead right. I have two translations of Tacitus Argicola and there are some differencs between the two. Why the bloody hell could they not be considerate enough to write in English :P
by Nerva
Wed Sep 10, 2008 9:31 pm
 
Forum: Classical
Topic: Celts and Germans - A Roman's Definition
Replies: 28
Views: 39321

Re: Names...

... speculation. The Irish have always called people of a Saxon persausion saxons, even in modern times - Sassana comes from Saxon, which means the English. Teh Welsh too, in modern times call the English "Saeson" from the same term. Our own name, "Gael" comes from the Welsh ...
by Freebeard
Wed Sep 10, 2008 4:51 pm
 
Forum: Early-Medieval
Topic: Names...
Replies: 14
Views: 13110

Re: Celts and Germans - A Roman's Definition

Well, usually doubt unless someone mentions something else. Xenophon's treatise on Darius' army certainly mentions armour-of-mail in the english translation I have. John Actually, it was just light grey wool knitted to look like mail :D Seriously though, have you seen the documentary on the ...
by Nerva
Mon Sep 08, 2008 8:59 am
 
Forum: Classical
Topic: Celts and Germans - A Roman's Definition
Replies: 28
Views: 39321

Re: Celts and Germans - A Roman's Definition

Well, usually doubt unless someone mentions something else. Xenophon's treatise on Darius' army certainly mentions armour-of-mail in the english translation I have. The mention of the Greek Mercenaries in 7thC BCE Egypt I came across in Oakeschott's 'an archeology of weapons' - unfortunately ...
by the_power
Mon Sep 08, 2008 8:52 am
 
Forum: Classical
Topic: Celts and Germans - A Roman's Definition
Replies: 28
Views: 39321

Re: Axes in early Ireland

Check out the illustrations on the Giraldus Cambrensis' manuscripts (Specifically MS 700) on http://www.isos.dias.ie/english/index2.html - there are images of Irish lads with axes. These are all 12thC. You can also check out my 12thC kit for a more complete idea of what I think they ...
by the_power
Thu Sep 04, 2008 4:06 pm
 
Forum: Early-Medieval
Topic: Axes in early Ireland
Replies: 26
Views: 29930

Re: Names...

... Irish into Alba (Scotland) in the middle of the first milennium which probably caused the name change over time? The Gaels always referred to the English as Sassenach - Saxons - even up to the present. So I suppose it's reasonable to assume that it took several centuries after the 'Scoti' arrived ...
by Leinsterman
Wed Aug 27, 2008 9:35 am
 
Forum: Early-Medieval
Topic: Names...
Replies: 14
Views: 13110

Re: Board content

... livinghistory.ie ? John Maybe because we're armed and organised. They want to know what beds the guns are under. Maybe they heard about those English coppers that got driven of the field by the Irish spear line (back in the old days) story and their riot squad want training. Maybe they want ...
by Dave Mooney
Wed Aug 27, 2008 7:27 am
 
Forum: General Chat
Topic: Board content
Replies: 25
Views: 24417

Re: Favourite Combat Aircraft?

What about this though... http://www.spyflight.co.uk/images/jpgs/buccaneer/buccs%20in%20echelon.jpg Or for prop driven... http://maxair2air.com/WEB%20MEDIA/Midland05-3/Thunderbolt-roars-by.jpg But my favorite cold war bird... http://www.aeroflight.co.uk/types/uk/english_electric/lightning/859690.jpg
by Nerva
Tue Aug 26, 2008 9:08 pm
 
Forum: 20th Century
Topic: Favourite Combat Aircraft?
Replies: 10
Views: 11974

Re: shillelagh

... and was carried around by Irishmen like others would use a walking staff... It is then very probable that when weapons carry was banned by the English they only switched the style to stick use. Giraldus also mentions it was brought by the Norwegians, which is plausible but partly denied by ...
by Max Chouinard
Sat Aug 23, 2008 5:19 pm
 
Forum: Historic Martial Arts, Arms and Armour
Topic: shillelagh
Replies: 23
Views: 30299

Re: shillelagh

... which I practice here in Quebec city, also in Glasgow and soon in the United States. I wrote an article about it but have yet to translate it in English. The art seems to have some ties to old style boxing, broadsword, axe and maybe Sean nos dancing. There is a one handed and a two handed grip, ...
by Max Chouinard
Fri Aug 22, 2008 8:25 pm
 
Forum: Historic Martial Arts, Arms and Armour
Topic: shillelagh
Replies: 23
Views: 30299
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