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The Irish Republican Army (IRA)

... from the Irish Volunteers in April 1916 and which was recognised in 1919 by Dáil Éireann (its elected assembly) as the legitimate army of the unilaterally declared Irish Republic, the Irish state proclaimed in the Easter Rising in 1916 and reaffirmed by the Dáil in January 1919. In Irish, it ...
by Na Fianna Éireann
Fri Jun 06, 2008 7:19 pm
 
Forum: 20th Century
Topic: Irish republican grouping 1916-1922
Replies: 10
Views: 20593

The Kilmichael Ambush

... The IRA men took up positions in the low rocky hills on either side of the road. As dusk fell between 4.05 and 4.20 on November 28, 1920 on a desolate roadside at Dus a' Bharraigh in the townland of Shanacashel, Kilmichael Parish, near Macroom the ambush took place. Just before the Auxiliaries ...
by Na Fianna Éireann
Fri Jun 06, 2008 6:54 pm
 
Forum: 20th Century
Topic: Ambushes of the War of Independence
Replies: 26
Views: 59332

The Dunmanway Massacre

... took him to a local priest before he died and then left for Bandon to report the incident to their superiors. According to Ryan (2003), Some days later (though it is not reported in the Irish daily newspapers) Capt Woods, Thomas Hornibrook and his son Samuel went missing, unaccounted for, and ...
by Na Fianna Éireann
Fri Jun 06, 2008 6:46 pm
 
Forum: 20th Century
Topic: Ambushes of the War of Independence
Replies: 26
Views: 59332

Re: shillelagh

I picked up a re-print of a late 19th C weapons manual which has a section on the use of the "shillalah". The descriptions are based on contempory use at country fairs in Cork and Kerry where "all is slashing and whacking ...
by Ian
Mon May 26, 2008 5:05 pm
 
Forum: Historic Martial Arts, Arms and Armour
Topic: shillelagh
Replies: 23
Views: 30309

Re: A little book arrived in the mail yesterday.....

... bibliography gives you everything that’s going to be useful to a reenactor anyway. The Skjoldehamn find has been pushed back to 995-1029AD from late 15thC, the Asle mitten pushed forward to 1470-1650AD from 300-400AD and the Overhogdal wall-hangings 890-1030AD from 12thC + others. I bought it ...
by Andrea L Redden
Sun May 25, 2008 1:04 pm
 
Forum: Early-Medieval
Topic: A little book arrived in the mail yesterday.....
Replies: 5
Views: 6785

Re: The Irish in Britain

... Britain to seek a better fortune, first in raids, but then also acting as foederati for the Romans and afterwards the Britons. There are several late roman units from the late IVth century Notitia Dignitatum bearing the name of the Attecotti. They were more likely coming to Britian as Pirate's ...
by Morcant
Wed May 21, 2008 10:15 pm
 
Forum: Classical
Topic: The Irish in Britain
Replies: 10
Views: 12717

Re: Were the roman army ever in Ireland(1st Cen AD)

... showing reconstruction of new buildings on existing foundations. The first period of occupation, Antonine I, came to an end sometime in the mid to late AD 150’s and seems to coincide with the arrival of re-enforcements for all three legions in Britannia and the new Governor Cnaeus Iulius Versus. ...
by Nerva
Tue May 20, 2008 9:10 pm
 
Forum: Classical
Topic: Were the roman army ever in Ireland(1st Cen AD)
Replies: 48
Views: 58796

Re: Before the Celts?

... tasks taking place in a henge. What's very interesting is that henges occur in the Boyne Valley along with passage tombs - but they are from the Late Neolithic as opposed to the Early/Middle Neolithic passage tombs. I wonder what sort of societal upheaval occured to warrant this change? If there ...
by RecycledViking
Fri May 16, 2008 12:36 am
 
Forum: Pre-History
Topic: Before the Celts?
Replies: 35
Views: 45054

Re: Were the roman army ever in Ireland(1st Cen AD)

... I have you all in tears! Sorry Brendan, but to answer your question, the use of the limes as a true defensive fortification probably dates to the late second century A.D. but you'll find much argument amongst acedemics both for and against the true purpose of the limes. A point of interest though ...
by Nerva
Wed May 14, 2008 10:54 pm
 
Forum: Classical
Topic: Were the roman army ever in Ireland(1st Cen AD)
Replies: 48
Views: 58796

Re: Celts - How do you define a people?

... Inscriptions, placenames, historical documents and second hand accounts all portray enough of these languages for us to identify them as being related. In modern times, it includes those who speak Irish, Scots Gaelic, Manx, Welsh and Breton, and can be extended to those who have revived Cornish. ...
by Billy
Wed May 14, 2008 10:45 am
 
Forum: Classical
Topic: Celts - How do you define a people?
Replies: 19
Views: 29347
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